Philosophy (PHIL)

Courses

PHIL 1000 (3) Introduction to Philosophy

Introduces students to the most fundamental questions of human existence, either topically or through various major figures in philosophy. Topics may include free will, the mind-body problem, the nature of the self, the existence of God, knowledge of the external world, the nature of morality, the meaning of life.

Additional Information: GT Pathways: GT-AH3 - Arts Hum: Ways of Thinking
Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1010 (3) Introduction to Western Philosophy: Ancient

Develops three related themes: the emergence in antiquity of a peculiarly scientific mode of thinking; the place of religious belief within this developing scientific world view; and the force of ethical speculation within the culture and political climates of ancient Greece and Rome. PHIL 1010 and PHIL 1020 may be taken in either order.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: CLAS 1030
Additional Information: GT Pathways: GT-AH3 - Arts Hum: Ways of Thinking
Arts Sci Core Curr: Historical Context
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1020 (3) Introduction to Western Philosophy: Modern

Introduces several philosophical texts and doctrines of 17th and 18th century Europe. Gives special attention to the connection between philosophical ideas and the wider historical milieu: social, political and literary. PHIL 1010 and PHIL 1020 may be taken in either order.

Additional Information: GT Pathways: GT-AH3 - Arts Hum: Ways of Thinking
Arts Sci Core Curr: Historical Context
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1030 (3) Introduction to Global Philosophy

Examines and compares different approaches to philosophy from across the globe, including Indian, Chinese, African, Islamic, Judaic, and European traditions. Topics may include: the nature of the self and reality, the foundations and limits of human knowledge, the role of the individual in the political community, the basic principles of ethics, and the meaning of life as a whole.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1100 (3) Ethics

Introductory study of major philosophies on the nature of the good for humanity, principles of evaluation, and moral choice as they apply to contemporary moral problems.

Additional Information: GT Pathways: GT-AH3 - Arts Hum: Ways of Thinking
Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1160 (3) Introduction to Medical Ethics

Introduces students to moral dilemmas in medical practice, biomedical research, and health policy, placing them in the context of comprehensive ethical theories and core principles of bioethics. Topics may include: euthanasia; abortion; organ procurement; moral status; research on nonhuman animals; navigating cultural differences between patients and health professionals; and the fair distribution of healthcare resources; as well as the bioethical issues arising from technological advances in medicine, including genetic engineering, cloning, and assistive reproductive technologies.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1200 (3) Contemporary Social Problems

Examines competing positions in debates over a wide variety of controversial moral, social and political issues. Topics may include: abortion, world poverty, animal rights, immigration, physician-assisted suicide, freedom of religion, hate speech, cloning, income inequality, pornography, gun rights, racial profiling, capital punishment, overpopulation, prostitution, drug legalization, torture. Formerly titled 'Philosophy and Society.'

Additional Information: GT Pathways: GT-AH3 - Arts Hum: Ways of Thinking
Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Core Curr: United States Context
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
MAPS Course: Social Science

PHIL 1250 (3) Poverty, Power, and Patriotism: Issues of Global Justice

Explores justice (and injustice) in global and local contexts, introducing students to major traditions in political philosophy and core concepts like equality, liberty, reciprocity, and distributive justice. Specific topics may include: racism; sexism; reparations; colonialism; famine; immigration; patriotism; exploitation; labor justice; climate change; terrorism; and war. Relates political topics in U.S. society to their global context, challenging students to consider marginalization along axes of race, gender, and class across cultural boundaries.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-Global Perspective
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1400 (3) Philosophy and the Sciences

Considers philosophical topics and concepts related to the natural sciences, such as the following: science and pseudo-science; scientific method; the nature of explanation, theory, confirmation, and falsification; the effect of science on basic concepts like mind, freedom, time, and causality; ethics of experimentation; and the relation of science to society.

Additional Information: GT Pathways: GT-AH3 - Arts Hum: Ways of Thinking
Arts Sci Core Curr: Natural Science Non-Sequence
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Natural Sciences

PHIL 1440 (3) Critical Thinking

Develops students' skills in evaluating arguments and other aspects of critical thinking, focusing on the ways people reason and attempt to justify their beliefs. Activities may include modeling arguments, detecting common fallacies, examining the use (and misuse) of scientific evidence, and learning the basics of symbolic logic. Formerly titled "Introductory Logic.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1500 (3) Reading, Writing and Reasoning

Teaches students how to write argumentative papers. Each seminar will focus narrowly on some controversial topic. For example, one seminar might focus on the existence of God, whereas another might question whether we have free will. In all cases, a significant portion of the course will be devoted to learning how to write cogent argumentative papers about controversial topics.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Written Communication
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Written Communication-Lower

PHIL 1600 (3) Philosophy and Religion

Philosophical introduction to some of the central concepts and beliefs of religious traditions, focusing particularly on the question of the existence of God and on the relation between religious beliefs and moral beliefs.

Additional Information: GT Pathways: GT-AH3 - Arts Hum: Ways of Thinking
Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Departmental Category: Asia Content

PHIL 1700 (3) Philosophy and the Arts

Considers philosophic questions involved in the analysis and assessment of artistic experiences and of the objects with which the arts, including the literary arts, are concerned.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1750 (3) Philosophy through Literature

Introduces philosophy through literature. Selected novels, plays, and short stories that exemplify traditional problems in philosophy are read and discussed.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 1800 (3) Open Topics/Philosophy

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2140 (3) Environmental Justice

Traditional and contemporary theories of justice are employed in order to critically analyze social and political issues that have important environmental dimensions. Assesses the relationship of justice and equity to the presuppositions of national and global environmental issues and policies.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2150 (3) Ethics and Sex

Explores a variety of moral questions relating to sex and procreation. Topics may include arguments for and against the wrongness of masturbation, incest, pedophilia, bestiality, necrophilia, voyeurism, pornography, sadomasochism, prostitution, abortion, commercial surrogacy and cloning, as well as arguments addressing such additional subjects as what constitutes rape and whether procreation is morally obligatory, optional, or forbidden.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2160 (3) Ethics and Information Technology

Examines contemporary ethical debates about the use, misuse, and development of information technology. Topics include ethical issues surrounding privacy, security, identity, hacking and cyber crime, automation technologies such as drones and self-driving cars, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Social Sciences

PHIL 2170 (3) Ethics and Economics

Examines a variety of perspectives on problems at the intersection of ethics and economics, using both empirical data and moral reasoning to evaluate arguments concerning topics such as: government regulation of private industry, protectionist economic policies, fair work compensation, retirement benefits, and access to health care.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2200 (3) Major Social Theories

Introductory study of major philosophies of the past in relation to political, economic, and social issues.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2220 (3) Philosophy and Law

Considers controversies about the law in general and the U.S. system in particular. Questions may include: What is law? What should the law prohibit (e.g., abortion, drug use, prostitution, cloning)? Is there a moral obligation to obey the law? Can civil disobedience be justified? How do we justify punishing those who break the law? Is capital punishment morally justifiable?

Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: United States Context
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2240 (3) Philosophy and Sports

Introduces students to philosophical issues surrounding sport. Topics may include: paying college athletes, sex testing in sports, the use of performance enhancing drugs, sports and gambling, the nature and value of sports and sportsmanship, gender equity and sports, the ethics of strategic fouling, sports fandom, the coach-athlete relationship, athletes as role models, and the risk of extreme bodily harm.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Social Sciences

PHIL 2260 (3) Philosophy and Food

Introduces students to topics and issues connected to the nature of food. Helps students investigate questions about our food choices, production and distribution, as well as connection food bears to culture and identity. No previous experience in philosophy required or presupposed.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2270 (3) Philosophy and Race

Explores the historical relationship between western philosophy and race and investigates the ways in which philosophy can be used to address contemporary racial issues.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Human Diversity
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-U.S. Perspective
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-Global Perspective

PHIL 2290 (3) Philosophy and Gender

Analyzes critically the concepts of sex, gender, and their intersection with other aspects of identity, exploring how these impact the extent to which people face injustice because of their gender.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Human Diversity
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-U.S. Perspective
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-Global Perspective

PHIL 2390 (3) Philosophy and Psychology

Interdisciplinary course on issues where philosophy and psychology meet. For example, topics such as selfhood, motivation, psychotherapy, freedom, and human behavior are examined. Selected readings in philosophy and psychology are required.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2440 (3) Symbolic Logic

Introduces students to sentential logic, the logic of quantification and some of the basic concepts and results of metalogic (interpretations, validity and soundness).

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2750 (3) Philosophy and Science Fiction

Explores philosophical issues in science fiction literature and film. Topics may include time travel, artificial intelligence, free will, personal identity, and how scientific advances will change human life and society. Students may read science fiction stories and philosophical articles, and watch several movies.

Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2800 (3) Open Topics/Philosophy

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 2840 (1-3) Independent Study

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 8.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.

PHIL 3000 (3) History of Ancient Philosophy

Survey of selected figures in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy and in medieval philosophy. Philosophers studied may include the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Hellenistic philosophers and such figures as Aquinas and Occam. Explores the larger cultural context that influenced these philosophers and were, in turn, influenced by them.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy coursework.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Historical Context
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3010 (3) History of Modern Philosophy

Introduces modern philosophy, focusing on the period from Descartes through Kant. In addition to careful analysis of philosophical arguments, attention is paid to the ways in which philosophers responded to and participated in major developments in the 17th and 18th century, such as the scientific revolution.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy coursework.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Historical Context
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3030 (3) Asian Philosophies

Explores various topics in Asian philosophy. Students will be exposed to and critically engage with a range of ethical, metaphysical, epistemological, and other philosophical issues in Chinese, Indian, and other Asian traditions, including discussion of how major Asian traditions relate to other approaches to philosophy. Specific topics and themes vary from term to term.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3100 (3) Ethical Theory

Examines important doctrines and arguments in various areas of theoretical ethics, such as the normative ethics of behavior, axiology, virtue theory and metaethics.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3110 (3) Feminist Practical Ethics

Explores a variety of personal and public policy issues in the light of the basic feminist commitment to opposing women's subordination. Provides a sense of how a principled commitment to feminism may influence or be influenced by prevailing interpretation of contemporary ideals and values, and gives an opportunity for developing skills of critical analysis.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: WGST 3110
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite PHIL 2290 or WGST 2000 or WGST 2290.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3140 (3) Environmental Ethics

Examines major traditions in moral philosophy to see what light they shed on value issues in environmental policy and the value presuppositions of the economic, ecological, and juridical approaches to the environment.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: ENVS 3140
Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite PHIL 1100 or PHIL 1200 or PHIL 2200 or PHIL 3100 or PHIL 3200.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3160 (3) Bioethics

Analysis of ethical problems involved in such issues as abortion, euthanasia, organ transplants, eugenics, treatment of the patient as a person and the institutional nature of the health care delivery system.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy coursework.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3180 (3) Critical Thinking: Contemporary Topics

Looks at a selected topic such as nuclear disarmament, racial and sexual discrimination, animal rights, or abortion and euthanasia by examining issues through the lens of critical philosophical analysis. Reviews the reasoning behind espoused positions and the logical connections and argument forms they contain.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy coursework.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3190 (3) War and Morality

Focuses on moral issues raised by war as a human institution. What are the justifications, limits and alternatives? Does the advent of nuclear weapons change the nature of war? Department enforced prerequisite: 6 hours of philosophy course work.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3200 (3) Social and Political Philosophy

Systematic discussion and analysis of such philosophic ideas as community, freedom, political power, and violence.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3260 (3) Philosophy and the International Order

Considers philosophical topics concerning the international economic, political and legal systems. Topics that may be considered include the nature of international law, war and peace, humanitarian intervention, international justice, world hunger and human rights.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy coursework.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-Global Perspective

PHIL 3310 (3) Cognitive Science

Introduces cognitive science, drawing from psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, and linguistics. Studies the linguistic relativity hypothesis, consciousness, categorization, linguistic rules, the mind-body problem, nature versus nurture, conceptual structure and metaphor, logic/problem solving and judgment. Emphasizes the nature, implications and limitations of the computational model of mind.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: LING 3005 and CSCI 3702 and PSYC 3005 and SLHS 3003 and CSPB 3702
Recommended: Prerequisites two of the following CSCI 1300 or LING 2000 or PHIL 2440 or PSYC 2145.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Natural Sciences
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Social Sciences

PHIL 3410 (3) History of Science: Ancients to Newton

Surveys the history of science up to Newton, including the emergence of scientific modes of thinking from religious and philosophical roots in the Near East and Greece to the development of these modes in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Culminates with Isaac Newton and the 17th century scientific revolution.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy coursework.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Historical Context
Arts Sci Core Curr: Natural Science Non-Sequence
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Natural Sciences

PHIL 3430 (3) History of Science: Newton to Einstein

History of physical and biological science, from the epoch-making achievements of Charles Darwin in biology to the dawn of the 20th century revolutions in physics, chemistry and genetics. Deals with the success of the mechanical philosophy of nature and its problems.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy coursework.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Historical Context
Arts Sci Core Curr: Natural Science Non-Sequence
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Natural Sciences

PHIL 3480 (3) Critical Thinking/Writing in Philosophy

Focuses upon the fundamental skills, methods, concepts and distinctions that are essential for the study of philosophy. Basic skills covered include the writing of philosophy papers, the reading of articles and the extraction and evaluation of arguments.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) Philosophy (PHIL) majors only (excluding minors).
Recommended: Prerequisites 6 hours of philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Written Communication
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Written Communication-Upper

PHIL 3600 (3) Philosophy of Religion

Philosophical discussion of fundamental issues in religion, such as existence of God, religious experience, faith and reason, evil, immortality and religious language.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy coursework.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3700 (3) Aesthetic Theory

Introduces major theories of aesthetics and contemporary discussions of problems, such as the nature of art and the problem of evaluations in art.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 6 hours of philosophy coursework.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3800 (3) Open Topics in Philosophy

See current departmental announcements for specific content. Department enforced prerequisite: 6 hours of philosophy course work.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 3840 (1-3) Independent Study

Department enforced prerequisite: 6 hours of philosophy course work.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 8.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).

PHIL 3930 (1-6) Internship in Social Policy

Under the guidance of an official in a governmental or non-governmental organization, students are assigned to projects selected for their academic suitability as well as for value to the sponsoring organization. Prior approval of department required.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Recommended: Prerequisites PHIL 1200 and PHIL 2200 and PHIL 3200 and 9 hours in moral or political philosophy course work.

PHIL 4010 (3) Single Philosopher

Intensively studies the work of one historical figure in philosophy, with the aim of reaching a broad understanding of the philosopher's whole body of thought. Philosophers covered include, from year to year, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Hume, and Kant. Includes at least one course per year on an ancient author and one course per year on a modern author.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5010
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 12.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4020 (3) Topics in the History of Philosophy

Examines a specific philosophical problem over an extended historical period.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5020
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 9.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisites 12 hours of philosophy course work including PHIL 3000 and PHIL 3010.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4030 (3) Medieval Philosophy

Introduces philosophy from the late Roman era to the 14th century. Philosophers studied may include Augustine, Boethius, Aquinas, and Ockham. Topics range over religion, ethics, mind, and metaphysics.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4040 (3) Studies in 20th Century Philosophy

Studies two or three major philosophies prominent during the last century.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4070 (3) Existentialist Philosophy

Examines central figures and texts in the existential tradition, from Kierkegaard and Nietzsche to Heidegger and Sartre.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4110 (3) Contemporary Moral Theory

Provides an in-depth look at some recent work in moral theory, usually organized around a single topic. Topics vary from year to year. Previous topics include: consequentialism and its critics, virtue theory, deontological ethics, moral psychology, well-being, and metaethics.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5110
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 9.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Requires prerequisite or corequisite of PHIL 3100 (minimum grade D-). Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors). Restricted to PHIL majors or PHIL minors.
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours of PHIL coursework (all minimum grade D-).
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4120 (3) Philosophy and Animals

Examines the moral status of nonhuman animals, and its implications for the common use of animals as food and experimental subjects for humans.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5120
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite PHIL 3100 and 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4150 (3) Topics in Applied Ethics

Discusses advanced work in applied normative philosophy. Topics vary from semester to semester and may focus on one or two specific areas (e.g., race, procreative ethics, military ethics, sports ethics) or take a broader approach that includes issues from across a wider range of subjects.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5150
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 9.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours of PHIL coursework.

PHIL 4200 (3) Contemporary Political Philosophy

Provides a survey of recent approaches to political philosophy: liberalism (Rawls, Dworkin); libertarianism (Nozick); communitarianism (Sandel, Macintyre); feminism (Jaggar). Topics and readings vary with the instructor.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5200
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Requires prerequisite courses of PHIL 2200 or PHIL 3200 (all minimum grade D-). Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours of philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4210 (3) Classical Greek Political Thought

Studies main representatives of political philosophy in antiquity (Plato, Aristotle, Cicero) and of the most important concepts and values of ancient political thought. No Greek or Latin required.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: CLAS 4041 and CLAS 5041 and HIST 4041
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4250 (3) Marxism

Historical and systematic study of principal themes of Marxist thought, from its Hegelian origins to its contemporary varieties, emphasizing the works of Marx and Engels.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: GRMN 4251
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours of GRMN or PHIL course work or instructor consent.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Social Sciences

PHIL 4260 (3) Philosophy of Law

Considers philosophical topics concerning law and the U.S. legal system. Topics that may be considered include the nature of law, relations between law and morality, justifications of punishment, the moral duty to obey the law, and law and liberty.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5260
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4300 (3) Philosophy of Mind

Discusses topics in the philosophy of mind, including the mind-body problem, consciousness, intentionality, rationality, mental causation and the nature of mental states.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5300
Requisites: Requires prerequisite courses PHIL 2440 and PHIL 3010 and PHIL 3480 and PHIL 4340 (all minimum grade D-). Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4340 (3) Epistemology

Studies some of the main topics of theory of knowledge, such as evidence, justification, prediction, explanation, skepticism, and concept acquisition.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: 5340
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Junior or Senior) Philosophy (PHIL) majors only.
Recommended: Prerequisites PHIL 3480 and 12 credit hours of philosophy including PHIL 2440 and PHIL 3010.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4360 (3) Metaphysics

Traditional and contemporary theories of the basic categories of reality and the human relationship to it, including universals, substance, identity, change, mind and body, free will and modality.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5360
Requisites: Requires prerequisite courses PHIL 2440 and PHIL 3010 and PHIL 3480 (all minimum grade D-). Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4370 (3) Free Will and Determinism

Explores the full range of questions relating to the problem of free will and determinism. Topics may include; the scientific evidence for determinism, hard versus soft determinism, arguments for and against the compatibility of free will and determinism, moral responsibility and the principle of alternate possibilities, hierarchical motivation, the deep self, reactive attitudes, the intelligibility question for libertarianism, divine foreknowledge.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5370
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4400 (3) Philosophy of Science

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5400
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisites 12 hours philosophy course work including PHIL 2440.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4440 (3) Topics in Logic

Provides for offering courses in a variety of topics in logic, including, but not limited to, mathematical logic, philosophical issues in logic, probability theory, decision theory, and inductive logic.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5440
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours PHIL coursework, including PHIL 2440.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4450 (3) History and Philosophy of Physics

Investigates the role of experiment in physics. Uses case studies in the history and philosophy of physics and in scientific methodology.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5450 and PHYS 4450 and PHYS 5450
Requisites: Requires prerequisite course PHYS 1020 or PHYS 1120 or PHYS 2020 (all minimum grade D-). Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities
Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Natural Sciences

PHIL 4460 (3) Modal Logic

Introduces the most philosophically relevant kind of logic that builds on PHIL 2440. Modal logic is the logic of the concepts of necessity, possibility and contingency. A variety of systems of sentential modal logic will be covered, along with the standard system of first-order modal logic.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5460
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite PHIL 2440.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4470 (3) Probability and Rational Choice

Examines issues in four related areas: probability theory (e.g. the interpretation of probability, the raven paradox, and the principle of indifference), decision theory (e.g., the Newcomb problem, the toxin puzzle, and Pascal's wager), game theory (e.g., Prisoner's dilemma, tragedy of the commons, and Schelling points), and social choice theory (e.g., Arrow's theorem). Familiarity with symbolic logic is strongly recommended.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5470
Recommended: Prerequisite PHIL 2440 and 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4490 (3) Philosophy of Language

Examines the nature of language through topics such as truth, reference, meaning, and use, as well as the general relationships between language and action, cognition, logic, and reality.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5490
Requisites: Requires prerequisite course PHIL 2440 (minimum grade D-). Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4800 (3) Open Topics in Philosophy

See current departmental announcements for specific content.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4830 (3) Senior Seminar in Philosophy

Critical in-depth examination of a selected philosophical topic.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Junior or Senior) Philosophy (PHIL) majors only.
Recommended: Prerequisite 15 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

PHIL 4840 (1-3) Independent Study

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 8.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 87-180 credits (Senior, Fifth Year Senior).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours philosophy course work.

PHIL 4950 (3) Honors Thesis

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors).
Recommended: Prerequisite 12 hours philosophy course work.
Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course

PHIL 5010 (3) Single Philosopher

Philosophers covered include, from year to year, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Hume, and Kant. Includes at least one course per year on an ancient author and one course per year on a modern author.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4010
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 12.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5020 (3) Topics in the History of Philosophy

Examines a specific philosophical problem over an extended historical period.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4020
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 9.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5030 (1) Greek Philosophical Texts

Selected readings in classical philosophy, in the original language, with a focus on achieving fluency in reading philosophical Greek.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 8.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.

PHIL 5040 (1) Latin Philosophical Texts

Selected readings in classical and medieval philosophy, in the original language, with a focus on achieving fluency in reading philosophical Latin.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 8.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.

PHIL 5100 (3) Ethics

Presents representative positions in normative ethics and metaethics.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5110 (3) Contemporary Moral Theory

Provides an in-depth look at some recent work in moral theory, usually organized around a single topic. Topics vary from year to year. Previous topics include: consequentialism and its critics, virtue theory, deontological ethics, moral psychology, well-being, and metaethics.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4110
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 9.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5120 (3) Philosophy and Animals

Examines the moral status of nonhuman animals, and its implications for the common use of animals as food and experimental subjects for humans.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 5120
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5150 (3) Topics in Applied Ethics

Discusses advanced work in applied normative philosophy. Topics vary from semester to semester and may focus on one or two specific areas (e.g., race, procreative ethics, military ethics, sports ethics) or take a broader approach that includes issues from across a wider range of subjects.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4150
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 9.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5200 (3) Contemporary Political Philosophy

Provides a survey of recent approaches to political philosophy: liberalism (Rawls, Dworkin); libertarianism (Nozick); communitarianism (Sandel, Macintyre); feminism (Jaggar). Topics and readings vary with the instructor.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4200
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5210 (3) Philosophy and Social Policy

Studies philosophical approaches to social and political issues such as abortion, bioethics, environmental preservation, human rights, and reverse discrimination. Gives attention to strengths and weaknesses of philosophical treatments of these issues.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5230 (3) Bioethics and Public Policy

Examines public policy implications of contemporary biological, genetic, biomedical, and behavioral science in light of ethics and human values. Considers theoretical and practical grounds for moral assessment of scientific research and possible applications of technology.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5240 (3) Seminar in Environmental Philosophy

Philosophical examination of several different approaches to environmental problems: economic, juridical, political and ecological. Discusses specific environmental problems, focusing on their moral dimensions, e.g., wilderness preservation, animal rights and land use and urban planning.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: ENVS 5240
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5260 (3) Philosophy of Law

Considers philosophical topics concerning law and the U.S. legal system. Topics that may be considered include the nature of law, relations between law and morality, justifications of punishment, the moral duty to obey the law, and law and liberty.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4260
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 9.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5290 (1-3) Topics in Values and Social Policy

Deals with topics in the area of philosophy and public policy and is often interdisciplinary in focus. Topics vary from one semester to another.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 7.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5300 (3) Philosophy of Mind

Discusses topics in the philosophy of mind, including the mind-body problem, consciousness, intentionality, rationality, mental causation and the nature of mental states.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4300
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5340 (3) Epistemology

Studies some of the main topics of theory of knowledge, such as evidence, justification, prediction, explanation, skepticism, and concept acquisition.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: 4340

PHIL 5360 (3) Metaphysics

Traditional and contemporary theories of the basic categories of reality and the human relationship to it, including universals, substance, identity, change, mind and body, free will and modality.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4360
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5370 (3) Free Will and Determinism

Explores the full range of questions relating to the problem of free will and determinism. Topics may include; the scientific evidence for determinism, hard versus soft determinism, arguments for and against the compatibility of free will and determinism, moral responsibility and the principle of alternate possibilities, hierarchical motivation, the deep self, reactive attitudes, the intelligibility question for libertarianism, divine foreknowledge.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4370

PHIL 5400 (3) Philosophy of Science

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4400
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5440 (3) Topics in Logic

Provides for offering courses in a variety of topics in logic, including, but not limited to, mathematical logic, philosophical issues in logic, probability theory, decision theory, and inductive logic.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4440
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5450 (3) History and Philosophy of Physics

Investigates the role of experiment in physics; case studies in the history and philosophy of physics and in scientific methodology.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4450 and PHYS 5450 and PHYS 5450
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5460 (3) Modal Logic

Introduces the most philosophically relevant kind of logic that builds on PHIL 2440. Modal logic is the logic of the concepts of necessity, possibility and contingency. A variety of systems of sentential modal logic will be covered, along with the standard system of first-order modal logic.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4460
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5470 (3) Probability and Rational Choice

Examines issues in four related areas: probability theory (e.g. the interpretation of probability, the raven paradox and the principle of indifference), decision theory (e.g., the Newcomb problem, the toxin puzzle and Pascal's wager), game theory (e.g., Prisoner's dilemma, tragedy of the commons and Schelling points) and social choice theory (e.g., Arrow's theorem). Familiarity with symbolic logic is strongly recommended.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4470
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5490 (3) Philosophy of Language

Examines theories and problems regarding the nature of language and its relation to reality. Concepts discussed include sense, reference, conventions, intentions and their relation to science and social life. Relevant literature includes readings in Frege, Russell, Quine, Putnam, Kripke and Chomsky.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: PHIL 4490
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5550 (3) Metaphysics and Epistemology Proseminar

Covers seminal classic texts and/or fundamental topics in analytic metaphysics and epistemology.

Requisites: Restricted to Philosophy graduate students only.

PHIL 5600 (3) Philosophy of Religion

Studies topics falling under philosophy of religion, such as proofs for God's existence, religious language, mysticism, psychology of religion, modern theological movements, miracles, and study of individual theologians.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5700 (3) Aesthetics

Analyzes the principal topics of aesthetics, including such issues as formal structure of aesthetics, the nature of critical judgments, and the status of the work of art.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5800 (3) Open Topics in Philosophy

Variety of new courses at the 5000 level. See current departmental announcements for specific content.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5810 (1-3) Special Topics in Philosophy

Instructor meets regularly with three or more students to discuss special topics in philosophy.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 5840 (1-3) Graduate Independent Study

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 6000 (3-4) Seminar in the History of Philosophy

Studies advanced topics in the history of philosophy. Content varies by semester, but may extend to any period in the history of philosophy, from the Presocratics into the modern era.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 12.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 6100 (3) Seminar in Ethics

Intensive study of selected topics in ethical theory.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 9.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 6200 (3) Seminar in Social and Political Philosophy

Provides an in-depth look at some particular topic in social and political philosophy, such as rights, political freedom, political obligation, or democracy.

Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 6300 (3) Seminar in Philosophy of Mind

Studies selected topics in philosophy of mind.

Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 6310 (3) Issues and Methods in Cognitive Science

Interdisciplinary introduction to cognitive science, examining ideas from cognitive psychology, philosophy, education, and linguistics via computational modeling and psychological experimentation. Includes philosophy of mind; learning; categorization; vision and mental imagery; consciousness; problem solving; decision making, and game-theory; language processing; connectionism. No background in computer science will be presumed.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: CSCI 6402 and EDUC 6504 and LING 6200 and PSYC 6200 and SLHS 6402
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.
Recommended: Prerequisite at least one course at the 3000-level or higher in CSCI, LING, PHIL, or PSYC.

PHIL 6340 (3) Seminar in Epistemology

Studies some of the main topics of epistemology, such as skepticism, foundations of knowledge, perception, introspection, belief, certainty, and analytic-synthetic distinctions.

Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 6380 (3) Seminar in Metaphysics

Intensive study of selected topics in metaphysics.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 15.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 6400 (3) Seminar in Philosophy of Science

Topics connected with development of nature of science: the structure of scientific theories, the testing of hypotheses, the theory of decisions in science and the basic conceptions and models of abstraction in the history of science.

Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 6490 (3) Seminar in Philosophy of Language

Studies some of the main topics in the philosophy of language, such as meaning and theories of meaning, translation, speech acts, rules of language, reference, relevance of psycholinguistics, language and thought, and language and ontology.

Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 6940 (1) Master's Candidate for Degree

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 7.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to Philosophy graduate students only.
Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

PHIL 6950 (1-6) Master's Thesis

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 7.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to Philosophy graduate students only.

PHIL 7415 (2) Cognitive Science Research Practicum

Independent, interdisciplinary research project in cognitive science for graduate students pursuing a joint PhD in an approved core discipline and cognitive

Requisites: Requires prerequisite course CSCI 6402 or EDUC 6504 or LING 6200 or PHIL 6310 or PSYC 6200 (minimum grade D-).

PHIL 7425 (2) Cognitive Science Research Practicum 2

Independent, interdisciplinary research project in cognitive science for advanced graduate students pursuing a joint PhD in an approved core discipline and cognitive science. Research projects integrate at least two areas within the cognitive sciences: psychology, computer science, linguistics, education, philosophy. Students need commitments from two mentors for their project.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: CSCI 7422 and EDUC 6516 and LING 7425 and PSYC 7425 and SLHS 7428
Requisites: Requires prerequisite course CSCI 6402 or EDUC 6504 or LING 6200 or PHIL 6310 or PSYC 6200 (minimum grade D-).
Recommended: Prerequisite EDUC 6505 or PHIL 6310.

PHIL 7810 (1) Topics in Cognitive Science

Reading of interdisciplinary innovative theories and methodologies of cognitive science. Students participate in the ICS Distinguished Speakers series that hosts internationally recognized cognitive scientists who share and discuss their current research. Session discussions include analysis of leading edge and controversial new approaches in cognitive science.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: CSCI 7772 and EDUC 7775 and LING 7775 and PSYC 7775 and SLHS 7775
Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 4.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to graduate students only.

PHIL 8990 (1-10) Doctoral Dissertation

All doctoral students must register for not fewer than 30 hours of dissertation credit as part of the requirements for the degree. For a detailed discussion of doctoral dissertation credit, refer to the Graduate School section.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 30.00 total credit hours.
Requisites: Restricted to Philosophy graduate students only.